Tuesday, March 20, 2012

English Willow wood explained

There are many different cricket bats to choose from. When first looking to buy a new cricket bat you have to decide price range, brand and then of course English or Kashmir Willow. Today I want to discuss English Willow and different levels of willow grade to help you decide which is best for you.
Let's first discuss a few details about English Willow because this is the most popular choice for cricket bat material. English Willow comes from the English Willow tree also called, Salix Alba Caerulea tree and most of them are found in various parts of England. They must mature for no less than 4 years before they are cut down for use in bat making. English willow is the best quality one can buy. The wood from English Willow is straight-grained and the grading is based upon flaws and the other things mentioned below.
A Grade 1 is the most alluring blade, though it may not necessarily play the best. There may be some red wood evident on the edge of the bat. The grain on the face will be straight and there will be at least 4 grains visible. It can have an odd small knot in the edge or back but not on playing area of the bat.
A Grade 2 blade is also very good quality and in grade 2 one can typically expect a larger amount of red wood on the edge of a bat, this has no effect on the playing ability of the bat it is purely cosmetic. Again there will be at least 4 straight grains on the face of the bat with maybe some blemishes, pin knots or small specks that are visible.
Grade 3 is the grade produced and sold most and it's an economical and good quality for money. A Grade 3 Blade has up to half colour across the bat and is therefore sometimes bleached, again this has no direct relation to the playing ability of the wood, and it just has less visual attraction. This grade will also have at least 4 grains on the face of the bat but they may not always be perfectly straight. Furthermore, it will contain more prominent specks and of course butterfly stains.
A Grade 4 Blade is normally bleached to cover up the discoloration, which typically covers over half the bat. The Grade 4 still plays quite well. It will most likely have multiple specks or butterfly stains in it.
In conclusion, when choosing your new cricket bat, make sure you are doing your research first. Quality is very important in this matter as you will hopefully keep the same bat for many years.

Lyndea Ward is the author and can provide more information on this and other cricket shopping and caring for tips. Visit http://www.thecricketspot.com today, at thecricketspot.com we focus on selling top of the line cricket products from premier lines such as; Kookaburra, Gray Nicholls, Gunn and Moore and more. Visit http://www.thecricketspot.com today and receive 10% off your order with coupon code enjoy10.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

more batting techniques explained......

To refresh the positions, there's the front foot strokes and back foot strokes. A batsman can change this position based on how the ball is thrown and where it is going. Front foot strokes are when the batsman's front foot stretches down the pitch toward the bowler and his weight is on the front foot. A back foot stroke is when the batsman's back foot is pushed back toward the wicket and his weight on his back foot.
The first to reference is the back foot defensive. This stroke is very similar to the front foot defensive only the weight is placed on the back foot. This stroke is typically used to defend the wicket instead of scoring. The main difference between the front foot and back foot defensive is that in the back foot defensive the ball can bounce higher and be reached a bit later because the weight is placed on the back foot.
Next is the stroke titled Cut. The Cut is an aggressive attack on the ball designed to hit the ball far and score runs. The bat is swung in a horizontal arc to the ground. With this technique the batsmen's swings right after the ball has passed the batsmen's body and in some cases quite awhile after it has past the batsmen's body. This is a technique that typically only the fairly skilled attempt.
The Pull is another type of aggressive cricket batting technique where the bat is pulled in a horizontal arc. It is called The Pull because the intention is to pull the ball to the leg side and score runs. This can also be a risky swing but also effective if used properly.
The hook, another aggressive technique, is a more difficult stroke. The intention with the hook is to hit the ball so high and far that you score 6 runs. The Hook uses a diagonal arc and is hit when the ball is about as high as the batsman's head, because of this it can be dangerous.
The last swing is the leg glance. The leg glance is not an aggressive shot and is actually rather subtle. The ball is hit on the side or around the batsmen's leg.
In conclusion, there are many different techniques for cricket batting. You should try them all to truly understand them. Once you have familiarized yourself more with the game, you will understand which stroke is appropriate at what time.
Lyndea Ward is the author and can provide more information on this and other cricket shopping and caring for tips. Visit http://www.thecricketspot.com today, at thecricketspot.com we focus on selling top of the line cricket products from premier lines such as; Kookaburra, Gray Nicholls, Gunn and Moore and more. Visit http://www.thecricketspot.com today and receive 10% off your order with coupon code enjoy10.

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Friday, March 9, 2012

Reebok to Sponsor US Cricket.......


The United States Youth Cricket Association is pleased to announce that Reebok Cricket has signed a three-year agreement to become the organization's Official Apparel Sponsor.
"USYCA welcomes this important partnership with Reebok Cricket," said USYCA President Jamie Harrison. "Reebok's leadership in the global cricket marketplace is well-established, and USYCA is proud to be associated with the Reebok brand.
"Reebok's sponsorship of USYCA is the first of its kind for an international sports brand in the United States cricket market, and thus continues the USYCA tradition of changing expectations for cricket in America," said Harrison.
For USYCA, the agreement will ensure that the organization's growth, and its ability to impact youth cricket development, will continue its dramatic pace.
"The funding derived from this partnership will help to further the expansion of youth cricket in the United States for years to come," Harrison said. "The bar has again been raised, and USYCA, working together with Reebok, looks forward to an exciting future."
"Reebok is proud to support USYCA and youth cricket in America," said Sai Vajha, Head of Cricket for Reebok North America. "The success of USYCA in developing cricket has set it apart, and Reebok is eager to join with USYCA in growing our great game in the United States."
In addition to the financial components, Reebok will produce official USYCA licensed apparel, which, along with other Reebok apparel and equipment, will be made available through a web portal on the USYCA homepage.
Reebok is also an official supplier of apparel to Sri Lanka, Canada and Zimbabwe national cricket sides, as well as several teams in the Indian Premier League.
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About Reebok
Reebok International Ltd., headquartered in Canton, Massachusetts, is a leading worldwide designer, marketer and distributor of sports, fitness and casual footwear, apparel and equipment. A subsidiary of the adidas Group, the company operates under the multiple divisions of the Reebok brand, Reebok-CCM Hockey and the Sports Licensed Division. For more information, visit Reebok at www.reebok.com.
About USYCA
The United States Youth Cricket Association (USYCA) is the largest organization in the United States devoted to the promotion of the game of cricket among young people and is a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. For more information, visit USYCA at usyca.org.